How to Get Rid of Roaches: An In-Depth Guide

Learn everything you need to know to identify, treat, and control every kind of roach without an exterminator. Use the chapter icons below to jump to the section you need most. 

The 4 Steps to Getting Rid of Roaches Without an Exterminator

Choose Indoor or Outdoor Roaches

In the steps below choose "indoor" or "outdoor" roaches to go straight to that section that best fits where your roach problem is happening on your property. If you are seeing roaches indoors, choose "Indoor" if you are seeing roaches outdoors, choose "Outdoor". 

Step #1 - Roach Inspection

The first step in getting rid of roaches is an inspection of the infected area. Since indoor roaches and outdoor roaches live in different areas in and around your home, you will have to do a thorough inspection to see what types of cockroaches you are dealing with. 

Indoor Roach InspectionOutdoor Roach Inspection

Step #2 - Roach Identification

Second, you must correctly identify the exact roach you are trying to get rid of so you can use the correct treatment. There are two main types of cockroaches. Indoor Roaches that can breed indoors and Outdoor Roaches that breed outdoors but like to sneak inside. Here are the specific roaches we will show you how to identify and get rid of in this section of the guide. 

Indoor Cockroaches

  • German Cockroach
  • Brown Banded Cockroach

Outdoor Cockroaches & Palmetto Bugs

  • American Cockroach
  • Australian Cockroach
  • Smokey-Brown and Brown Cockroaches
  • Asian Cockroach
  • Oriental Cockroaches
  • Florida Woods Cockroach
    Indoor Roach IdentificationOutdoor Roach Identification

    Step #3 - Roach Treatment

    Third, to get rid of roaches you need to begin a roach treatment plan. Using a few simple steps  you can treat your roach problem just like the pros would if you hired them, at a fraction of the cost. In this section you will learn how to stop roaches using the same professional products they do. 

    Our affordable and easy to use roach control kits have everything you need to treat and control roaches in your home, apartment, condo, trailer,  business, and more. 


    Indoor Roach TreatmentOutdoor Roach Treatment

    Step #4 - Roach Prevention

    Lastly, once you have gotten rid of your roach problem you will want to put steps in place to prevent them from coming back again. Prevention will lead to long term roach control and stop future headaches before they start.

    This section will give you simple step by step tips to prevent a roach outbreak from happening to you again. This will give you the peace of mind that you are actively protecting your property and that you finally gotten rid of roaches for good! 

    Indoor Roach PreventionOutdoor Roach Prevention

      Step #1 - Indoor Roach Inspection

      The first step to proper roach treatment is inspecting your home to determine what type of roaches are present.
      This section of the guide will help you in your inspection. 

      Since indoor roaches and  outdoor roaches live in different places, you will have two parts to a thorough inspection for pest cockroaches.  Let's start with the indoor roach inspection. 

      Indoor Roach Inspection

      Indoor Roaches Discussed in this Inspection:

      • German Cockroach
      • Brown Banded Cockroach

      Indoor cockroaches are the most common. Indoor cockroaches like the German Cockroach and the Brown-Banded Cockroach live and breed entirely indoors.

      German Roaches are the roaches people are the most familiar with. They rapidly breed, especially in kitchens, and prefer to come out at night. When you turn on a light at night you may see dozens of German roaches scurrying to hide in a dark place.

      How to Inspect for German Roaches

      Start in the kitchen. German roaches like places that are warm, dark, and have a lot of moisture.

      Where to look:

      • In the upper corners in cabinets and under counters
      • Behind, under, or in large appliances like the refrigerator and stove
      • Inside or under small appliances like microwaves, coffee makers, etc.
      • Hiding in cardboard or stored plastic/paper grocery bags
      • Hiding in other clutter

      German Roaches Prefer Areas:

      • High moisture
      • Warmth
      • Available Food
      • Darkness

      (Check Kitchens and Bathrooms)

      If there is a large population in the kitchen German roaches will also begin to migrate into other rooms of the home.

      Generally, the German Roaches will not do well in other rooms of the house unless there is a lot of food and moisture available. If there you see food and moisture sources in other rooms (like a teenager with a pile of dirty dishes in his bedroom) check closely there too.

      If not, focus most of your time on the kitchen and bathrooms.

      What you will find if German Roaches are present:

      Live German Roaches

      Dead German Roaches

      Fecal Spotting

      How to Inspect for Brown-Banded Roaches

      First, Brown-banded Roaches are not common at all. However, if you think you may have brown-banded roaches, you are going to look in completely different places than you would for German Roaches.

      Brown-banded Roaches are typically NOT in kitchens or bathrooms. They do very well in closets, garages, mini-storage units and anywhere else items are stored.

      Brown-banded Roaches do not need a lot of food or moisture.

      Brown-banded Roaches can get everything they need to survive from starches and moisture that is in the cardboard and the glue used to make cardboard boxes!

      Especially in places that are not air conditioned like garages or certain regions of the country that don’t use air-conditioning, Brown-banded roaches can do very well.

      Where to look:

      • In the upper 1/3 of walls and behind items in these areas
      • On shelves, behind pictures, etc.
      • Along cracks and crevices along crown molding
      • In closets, especially the upper shelves
      • Any cardboard boxes used for storage

      Brown-Banded Roaches Prefer Areas:

      • That are dry
      • On the top 1/3 of walls

      (Check closets, behind pictures, and crown moldings)

      What you will find if Brown-Banded Roaches are present:

      Live Brown-Banded Roaches

      Dead Brown-Banded Roaches

      Egg Capsules

      Step #2 - Indoor Roach Identification

      Second, correctly identify your indoor roach so you can use the correct treatment. This section of the guide will help you in your identification.

      Indoor Roach IDentification

      Indoor Roaches Identified in this Section:

      • German Cockroach
      • Brown Banded Cockroach

      How to IDENTIFY German Roaches

      Indoor German Roach PictureCloseup of an indoor german roach

      German Roaches – By far the most common pest cockroach. These are the smaller (up to 5/8 inch long) roaches that live and breed in areas of high food and moisture like your kitchen and bathroom.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 5/8 inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – German roaches can go from egg to adult in 60 days. There go through five nymphal stages before becoming an adult. An adult female can produce a new egg capsule that contains about 40 eggs every 30 days! Each roach can live for six to 12 months.
      Adults – Adults have two dark stripes that run parallel to their bodies. Unlike other roaches, pregnant females carry their egg cases with them. Adults are up to 5/8 inch long.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to ½ inch long and are dark brown with a single white spot on their back.
      Easily Confused With - Asian Cockroaches, Brown Banded Cockroaches.
      Distribution – Entire United States.
      Control – View the German Roach Control Section

      How to IDENTIFY Brown Banded Cockroaches

      Indoor German Roach Picture

      Brown Banded Cockroaches – These roaches are not very common at all. Professional Pest Control Operators may only see these a few times in their career, but this leads to them often being mis-identified. These are smaller (up to 5/8 inch long) roaches, but unlike German Roaches, Brown Banded Roaches prefer dry areas. They are typically found in areas like closets, garages, and mini-storage units. Brown Banded Roaches prefer to be up high, usually on shelfs, behind crown moldings, or other areas on the top 1/3 of walls.

      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 5/8 inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – Brown Banded Roaches will go through a very similar lifecycle as German Roaches. They will have egg case, several nymphal stages, and adult stages. However, Brown Banded Roaches do not produce as many offspring. A female will only produce about 12 egg cases each containing about 12 eggs, but that is still a lot! Each individual roach can live for up to 12 months.
      Adults – Brown Banded Roaches have two whiteish stripes on their back that are perpendicular to their body. On adults, these may be harder to see through their wings, but the stripes are still there. Adults are up to 5/8 inch long.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to ½ inch long and are dark brown with two whitish perpendicular stripes on their back like the adults have.
      Easily Confused With - Asian Cockroaches, German Cockroaches.
      Distribution – Entire United States.
      Control – View the Brown Banded Roach Control Section

      Step #3 - Indoor Roach Treatment

      The third step is to begin an indoor roach treatment program. This section of the guide will help you in your treatment. 

      Indoor Roach Treatment

      Indoor Cockroaches - German Cockroach and Brown-banded treatments

      German roaches and Brown-banded roach treatments are both very similar. The best treatment is to use a combination of baits indoors where they live. Sprays don’t kill the roaches in the walls and can cause the roaches to not eat baits as well. Sprays actually make it more difficult to get 100% rid of German and Brown Banded cockroaches. Treatments will be very similar for German roaches and Brown-banded. You will just treat different areas. German roaches prefer areas with a lot of food like kitchens and bathrooms and Brown-banded roaches prefer closets, storage areas, and other dry areas.

      To treat for indoor roaches, follow these steps:

      10 Steps for Baiting German Roaches with Gel Bait (works for Brown-banded roaches too)

      • Always read and follow label directions.
      • Clean as much as possible before the treatment. This will reduce competing food sources and using cleaners after baiting can change the flavor of bait rendering it ineffective.
      • On minor/moderate infestations expect to apply about half a tube of bait each treatment.
      • Reapply bait twice a week so fresh bait is always available.
      • 5. Rotate to a different bait each application. No one bait works 100% of the time. Some roaches won’t like a “flavor” of some baits but will like others. Use at least three different baits. To make it easy, we have an ePestHero German Roach Kit with everything you need.
      • Many small placements placed 4” to 6” apart works better than “caulking” with the bait.
      • Pay special attention to areas with heat & moisture (under sinks, behind fridge & stove, etc).
      • When you find harborages (where roaches like to hide) treat as close to there as possible also.
      • Do not contaminate baits with insecticide sprays or cleaners. When you do clean, you may need to reapply bait after the area has dried.
      • Use non-toxic monitors such as 288i monitors to confirm all roaches are gone and to catch any new infestations early.

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      ePestHero German Roach Kit

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      Step #4 - Indoor Roach Prevention

      The fourth step involves preventing indoor roaches from coming back.  This section of the guide will help you in your roach prevention. 

      Indoor Roach Prevention

      German Cockroach and Brown-banded cockroach Prevention 

      German roaches and Brown-banded roaches are great hitchhikers. They do not live outdoors and find their way into your home by “hitchhiking” on items that you bring into your home.

      First, eliminate cardboard in your home or business. Cardboard is the favorite harborage area of cockroaches. Many restaurants have put into place a policy of items in cardboard boxes not leaving the receiving area. Items are checked in, removed from cardboard packaging, placed in plastic containers, and the cardboard taken directly to the dumpster. This allows a thorough inspection of the items plus eliminates harborage areas in kitchen areas.

      Next, identify items that come in and go out of your home or business. These are items that could easily be bringing in new roaches. Check these items carefully when they arrive.

      For example, I find German roaches in used furniture or appliances that came from an infested home. I have also seen children bring roaches home in their lunchboxes when their schools are infested. How did the school get infested? It is a frequent problem when other children bring their lunchboxes and backpacks to school from their infested home.

      Finally, be alert for people that come in and out of your home. Do any relatives stay over frequently? Do you have a nanny/housekeeper? Do your kids go into someone else’s home for daycare and then possibly return with roaches? Often when these people come over they bring personal items such as lunch bags, backpacks, or even luggage that can carry roaches into your home.

      Items German Roaches Can HITCHHIKE on:

      • Food packaging
      • Lunch boxes/bags
      • School backpacks
      • Luggage
      • Used cardboard boxes
      • Anything else brought in from an infested location.

      Step #1 - Outdoor Roach Inspection

      The first step to proper roach treatment is inspecting your home to determine what type of roaches are present.
      This section of the guide will help you in your inspection. 

      Outdoor Roach Inspection

      Outdoor Roaches Discussed in this Inspection:

      • American Cockroach
      • Australian Cockroach
      • Smokey-Brown and Brown Cockroaches
      • Asian Cockroach
      • Oriental Cockroaches
      • Florida Woods Cockroach

      Outdoor Roaches, also called Palmetto Bugs or Water Bugs, reproduce outdoors but sometimes like to sneak indoors. This means that your inspection will primarily be for entry points where they can sneak in.

      Especially during the first few cold fronts of the year, outdoor roaches seek out warm places to hide. If they can feel warm air leak out around your front door they may decide to follow that warm air into your home!

      Also, I would like to note that in rare cases Outdoor Roaches can breed indoors. However, this is only if you “bring outdoor conditions inside”.

      This only happens if there is a major water source from an air-conditioner, roof leak, or flood damage.

      Most species of Outdoor Roaches will come directly from the outdoors by squeezing through a gap on the exterior of your home (usually around a door or window).

      The exception are American Roaches. They love to be in sewers and septic tanks by the thousands. Normally they cannot get past the sewer “traps” that hold water that are located in every drain or toilet in your home.

      However, if a drain dries up or if there is a broken sewer line, you may see a continual problem with American Roaches.

      They still dry up and die once they sneak inside, but more take their place.

      If you are seeing several American Roaches per week inspect your plumbing closely.

      If you think you have a broken pipe or larger problem, plumbers can do special “smoke-tests” to find the broken pipe.

      Where to look:

      • Look for gaps around all doors (front door, sliding doors, garage doors, etc). If you can see light coming in around a door, that is enough room for a roach to squeeze through.
      • Look for gaps around water pipes, cable lines, and other utilities on the exterior that need sealed.
      • Make sure all windows are shut completely, are caulked properly, and have good-fitting screens.
      • Check for unused drains that may be dry. If water hasn’t been ran down them in about a week these may be entry points too. Tubs, spare bathrooms, and floor drains are common issues.
      • Look for a “rocking toilet”. If a toilet can wiggle even a little bit, that means the wax-ring is bad giving roaches access from the sewers.
      • Any other known open or broken sewer lines can be the source, especially in old or recently remodeled homes.
      • Look indoors for the roaches themselves. Most will dry up and die near entry points. Others will be attracted to moist areas like kitchens and bathrooms.
      • Check in potted plants. They have food, moisture, and warmth roaches love.
      • Check in cardboard boxes. Especially if they are stored in humid areas like garages or attics.
      • Be on the lookout for signs of a major water leak (roof leak, air-conditioner leak, flood damage, etc
      roaches stopped by a wet p-trap in a drain pipe verses roaches that can get into a house through a dry p-trap drain

      Example of a wet drain pipe verses a dry drain pipe in stopping outdoor roaches from getting into your home.

      What you will find if Outdoor  Roaches are present:

      • Live Roaches themselves – usually just one here or there. Remember they don’t breed indoors.
      • Dead roaches– usually just one here or there. Remember they don’t breed indoors.
      • Fecal spotting, especially in areas where roaches like to “hang out” a lot.
      • Gaps around doors, windows, or other entry points where they enter.
      • Dry drains or other open/broken sewer lines.

      Step #2 - Outdoor Roach Identification

      Second, correctly identify your outdoor roach so you can use the correct treatment. This section of the guide will help you in your identification.

      Outdoor Roach And Palmetto bug IDentification

      Indoor German Roach Picture

      Outdoor cockroaches are also known as Palmetto Bugs or Water Bugs. They live outside your home and sneak inside. They like to live in wet areas like mulch, leaf-litter, plants, trees, or in the sewers. Under normal conditions, they cannot reproduce indoors because it is too dry. Outdoors Roaches that sneak inside typically die within a week under dry, indoor conditions. However, if your home has a roof or plumbing leak it is possible for these roaches to complete their entire lifecycle indoors.

      Outdoor Roach droppings are often confused with mouse droppings. They look very similar and are both about 1/8 long. With a magnifier, you can roach droppings are more hexagon shaped with 6-ridges along the sides while mouse droppings are rounded. Mouse droppings also tend to contain hairs since mice groom themselves.

      How to IDENTIFY American Cockroaches

      Closeup Photo of an American RoachImage showing the lifecycle of an American Roach. Nymphs and Adults.

      American Cockroaches – American roaches are the second most common cockroach in the United States. In the southern United States American Roaches will live and reproduce in outdoor landscapes. However, American Roaches are also very well adapted to living in sewers and basements. Even in northern states, the American Roaches can be found living in sewer systems year round.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 1 3/4 inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – American Roaches have a much slower lifecycle than German Roaches. It can take American Roaches over a year to go from egg to adult. Adult females can live for another year after that and during that time she can produce a new egg capsule that contains about 12 eggs every week!
      Adults – Adults are reddish-brown with a pale-yellow band around the plate that covers the back of their neck (called a pronotum). Adults are up to 1 3/4 inch long. In warm temperatures American Roaches can fly.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to 1 1/2 inch long and are uniformly reddish-brown in color. American Roach nymphs do not have white or yellowish spots like German roach or Australian Roach nymphs.
      Easily Confused With - Australian Roaches, Smokey-Brown Roaches
      Distribution – Entire United States.
      Control – View the American Roach Control Section

      How to IDENTIFY Australian Cockroaches

      Closeup of an Australian CockroachGroup of Australian CockroachesLifecycle of an Australian Cockroach

      Australian Cockroaches – Australian roaches are second most common Outdoor Cockroach after the American Cockroach. Australian Roaches do not like living in the sewers like American Roaches. However, they do love living around buildings in mulch, plants, and trees. Cold weather often drives them to seek warmth indoors. Many people find many sneaking inside after the first few cold fronts each fall.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 1 1/2 inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – It can take Australian Roaches almost a year to go from egg to adult. Adult females can live for another year after that and during that time she can produce a new egg capsule that contains about 20 eggs every week!
      Adults – Adults are reddish-brown with a pale-yellow band around the plate that covers the back of their neck (called a pronotum) similar to American Roaches. However, the dark spots on the pronotum are more distinct and is often said to resemble a “Batman” symbol. Adults are up to 1 1/2 inch long.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to 1 1/4 inch long and brown with a mottled pattern. Early stage nymphs have perpendicular white line and two white dots on their back. Older Australian Roach nymphs are reddish-brown with yellowish spots along the sides of their back.
      Easily Confused With - American Roaches, Smokey-Brown Roaches
      Distribution – Southeast United States.
      Control – View the Australian Roach Control Section

      How to IDENTIFY Smokey-Brown and brown Cockroaches

      Lifecycle of a Smokey-Brown and Brown Cockroach

      Smokey-Brown and Brown Cockroaches – Smokey-brown and Brown Cockroaches are less common than American or Australian Cockroaches. They look similar to American roaches but with a darker mahogany-brown color. However, they do not like the sewers like the American Roach and are primarily found in landscapes in the Southeast United States. Their habits and control methods are very similar to Australian Roaches.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 1 1/2 inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – Smokey-brown and Roaches have a similar lifecycle to Australian Roaches. It takes about a year for Smokey-Brown or Brown Roaches to go from egg to adult. Adult females can live for another year after that and during that time she can produce a new egg capsule that contains about 20 eggs every week!
      Adults – Adults are uniform dark mahogany color on their top and bottom side without any distinct markings. Adults are up to 1 1/2 inch long.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to 1 1/4 inch long and are uniformly dark mahogany color in color without any distinct markings.
      Easily Confused With - Australian Roaches, American Roaches
      Distribution – Southeast United States.
      Control – View the Smokey-brown and Brown Roach Control Section

      How to IDENTIFY ASian Cockroaches

      Adult Asian Cockroach Laying Egg CasingLifecycle of an Asian Cockroach

      Asian Cockroaches – Asian Roaches are very closely related species to German Roaches. Visually, they are very difficult to tell apart. However, their behaviors are very different. While German roaches live exclusively indoors (they prefer kitchen areas), Asian Roaches live outdoors in mulch, leaf-litter, trees, and shrubs. Also, Asian roaches aren’t repelled by light and are actually attracted to light. For this reason, Asian Roaches are often attracted to windows and doors at night and sometimes sneak inside.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 5/8 inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – Asian Roaches can go from egg to adult in 60 days. An adult female can produce a new egg capsule that contains about 40 eggs every 30 days! Each roach can live for six to 12 months. Adults – Adults look identical to German Roaches. Adults have two dark stripes that run parallel to their bodies. Unlike other roaches, pregnant females carry their egg cases with them. Adults are up to 5/8 inch long. The key to telling German and Asian Roaches apart is that Asian Roaches primarily live outside and are not repelled by light like German Roaches.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to ½ inch long and are dark brown with a single white spot on their back.
      Easily Confused With - German Cockroaches, Brown Banded Cockroaches.
      Distribution – Southeast United States.
      Control – View the Asian Roach Control Section

      How to IDENTIFY Oriental Cockroaches

      Adult Oriental CockroachAdult Oriental CockroachAdult Oriental Cockroach

      Oriental Cockroaches – Oriental Roaches are more cold hardy than other outdoor roaches. For this reason, Oriental Roaches are also found further north into the Midwest and Northwestern United States. Adults are slightly smaller than most other outdoor roaches and do not have wings that cover their entire body.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 1 inch (adults). Lifecycle – Oriental Roaches live between one and two years. A female can have an average of 8 egg capsules in her lifetime each containing about 16 eggs each.
      Adults – Adults are dark-brown to black. The key characteristic is that Oriental Roach adults do not have fully formed wings. Females only have small wing pads and males have wings that only reach ¾ the way to the end of their body. Adults are up to 1 3/4 inch long.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to 1 1/2 inch long and are uniformly reddish-brown in color. Nymphs will be very similar in appearance to American Roaches.
      Easily Confused With - Australian Roaches, American Roaches, and Smokey-Brown Roaches Distribution – Northwest, Midwest, Southern, and Southeast United States.
      Control – View the Oriental Roach Control Section

      How to IDENTIFY FLorida Woods Cockroaches

      Adult Florida Woods CockroachFlorida Woods Cockroach Nymph Baby

      Florida Woods Cockroaches – The Florida Woods Roach is often mistaken for the Oriental Cockroach due to the adults lacking fully formed wings. However, the Florida Woods Roach is easy to identify by its slow-moving behavior, wider body, and the foul smell from defensive secretions used by adults when disturbed. Florida Woods Roaches prefer outdoors and rarely wonder indoors on their own. However, they are commonly found in firewood and sometimes “hitch-hike” indoors.
      Size – From 1/8 inch (first stage nymphs) up to 1 3/4inch (adults).
      Lifecycle – Florida Woods Roaches live between one and two years. Females produce egg cases much larger than other roaches, usually ½ inch ¾ inch long.
      Adults – Adults are uniformly reddish-brown to black. Adults are up to 1 3/4 inch long.
      Nymphs (babies) – Nymphs are 1/8 to 1 1/2 inch long and are uniformly reddish-brown in color. Nymphs will look very similar to other outdoor roach nymphs, but have faint pale yellow streaks down the sides of their back.
      Easily Confused With - Oriental Roaches, American Roaches, Australian Roaches, and Smokey-Brown Roaches
      Distribution – Florida and the very southern regions of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia.
      Control – View the Florida Woods Roach Control Section

      Step #3 - Outdoor Roach Treatment

      The third step is to begin an indoor roach treatment program. This section of the guide will help you in your treatment. 

      Outdoor Roach Treatment

       To control roaches such as American, Australian, Oriental, Asian, Smokey-Brown, and Florida Woods roaches follow these steps.

      These roaches typically sneak in from outside. Once inside they typically cannot reproduce and die in a few days.

      2 Steps to treating outdoor roaches

      The key to control is to use perimeter barrier treatment to keep them from getting inside in the first place. In most cases, no indoor treatment is needed. First, the best treatment is to create a 5 foot treatment zone around your home or business with a granular bait such as Niban. This is a long-lasting weather-resistant bait that only needs reapplied every 2 or 3 months. Apply to all turf, mulch bed, plant areas, etc. in this 5ft treatment zone. It will only take about one pound to treat an average sized house. There is no need to apply to solid surfaces like driveways, sidewalks, or pool decks.

      Next, use a liquid like Temprid FX to spot treat any entry areas that cannot be sealed up. The most common entry areas are along the base of doors, around poorly sealing windows, where utility lines enter (cable phone), around plumbing pipes, or any other entry gap in the exterior wall. Usually this takes a gallon or less to treat an average home. This will need to be repeated every 2 or 3 months.

      Those two steps will stop most outdoor roaches from getting inside. In some cases, they can come in from plumbing breaks or roof leaks. The treatment for these situations is to fix the break or roof leak.

      Step #4 - Outdoor Roach Prevention

      The fourth step involves preventing outdoor roaches from coming back. This section of the guide will help you in your roach prevention. 

      Outdoor Roach Prevention

      Outdoor roaches such as American, Australian, Oriental, Asian, Smokey-Brown, and Florida Woods roaches live outside your home or business and sneak inside.

      The key to preventing these roaches is to seal up entry points. The most common culprits are bad seals around entry doors.

      Residential sliding doors, French doors, or commercial double doors are notorious for having gaps along the bottom.

      The rule of thumb is if you can see light coming in around a door then it is enough of a gap for roaches to sneak inside.

      These doors need to be replaced or have additional weather-stripping added to seal out these intruders.

      Also, be aware of gaps around windows, utility lines (cable, phone, etc), other gaps in exterior walls where roaches could enter. Caulking these areas is a permanent fix.

      American roaches are also known to live in large numbers in the sewer systems. A broken sewer pipe in the wall, a bad wax ring under a toilet, or even just a dry drain will allow access for these roaches into your home or business.

      Seasonal residents who don’t have someone running water in every drain weekly while they are gone often find a large number of American roaches in their home when they return.

      I also see a lot of these in homes with multiple bathrooms and jacuzzi tubs. The homeowner doesn’t use some of the sinks or tubs in the home, the drains dry up, and the roaches have free access inside.

      The same can happen in commercial buildings where water is never ran down certain floor drains. Fixing any plumbing breaks and running water down every drain at least weekly is the permanent fix for these issues.

      Lastly, if you have “outdoor conditions” inside then these roaches can breed indoors in rare circumstances. They need a lot of moisture so the scenario is usually a leaking roof or leaky AC unit that causes moisture. These conditions then grows mold, fungi, and algae.

      This becomes an indoor wood and water source allowing “outdoor” roaches to live and breed indoors.

      Fixing any moisture leaks needs to be a top priority and any remaining outdoors hiding indoors will quickly dry out and die.